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Lakeland University has established a new scholarship that honors the legacy and contributions of Col. Yong Chue Yang, who led Hmong families to the Sheboygan area in search of freedom and opportunity.

The Col. Yong Chue Yang Scholarship will award $15,000 annually to student descendants of families who were displaced by the Vietnam conflict, who qualify for admission to Lakeland University bachelor's degree programs and who demonstrate the qualities of community service and diligence Yang embodied.

"Col. Yang showed great courage, leadership and resolve in building opportunities in this community for Hmong people facing the most difficult of challenges as political refugees," said Lakeland President David Black. "The qualities of wisdom and diligence that were modelled by Col. Yang and then exemplified by succeeding generations in the Hmong community continue to make Lakeland a better university."

Black noted that several families influenced by Yang have seen relatives enroll at Lakeland, some later teaching and filling administrative positions at Lakeland and one, Kashoua "Kristy" Yang, recently becoming the first female Hmong judge in the nation.

The Hmong settlement in Sheboygan mirrors the German settlers who founded Lakeland, Black said. In the mid-1800's, German families who were no longer welcome in their homeland came to Sheboygan County in search of freedom and opportunity.

"As they overcame barriers of language and economics, they founded what is now Lakeland University as a place where succeeding generations would prepare for successful lives and professions," Black said.

More than a century later, in 1976, Yang led Hmong families to this same community, again in search of freedom and opportunity, and again facing challenges of language and economics.

"Col. Yang was wise and determined," Black said.

While working with religious and governmental agencies to organize and lead the Hmong Mutual Assistance Association in Sheboygan and across the state, Yang set an example for his people of gainful employment in local companies and an insistence on education for the Hmong community. In 1985, Yang and his wife, Plia Yang, received U.S. Citizenship.

To apply for this scholarship, students will be required to attach a 100-250-word personal statement that outlines the student's family background and the impact that community service has made in the student's own life.

Access to the Col. Yong Chue Yang Scholarship application is available at lakeland.edu/scholarships. For more information about the scholarship, contact Sam Poullette at or 920-565-1022 ext. 2131.

The versatility of artist and Lakeland graduate Tyler Holman will be the focus when Lakeland University's Bradley Gallery presents its first exhibit of the 2017-18 season.

An opening reception will be held Friday, Sept. 8, at 4:30 p.m. in the Bradley Gallery, located in the Bradley Fine Arts Building on Lakeland's campus. The exhibit will be on display until Oct. 6.

The Bradley Gallery is open from 8 a.m.-4 p.m., Monday through Friday, when the university is in session. Attendance at the reception and admittance to the Bradley Gallery are both free and open to the public.

Holman, who graduated from Lakeland in 2014 with a bachelor of arts degree and a double major in studio arts and graphic arts, serves a wide range of clients through his personal business, A Tyler Holman Project. He said the business originates from his time at Lakeland.

"Fellow students would pronounce during the days of critique, 'I can tell this is a Tyler Holman project,'" Holman said. "Despite the medium, it was the stylistic traits, the state of ambition and the spark of appeal that provoked feeling and remembrance. Furthermore, it has been most important to maintain this perspective and artistic practice in order to attract new companies, maintain existing relationships and to sell product."

Holman has produced a wide variety of work for companies all over the United States and abroad, and he admits categorizing what he does can be challenging.

"Upon graduating college – even prior to graduating – I received employment through various freelance and contract objectives categorizing me with titles," Holman said. "Despite the title, however, multiple employers utilized me for various artistic objectives beyond the main priority and continued to return for services.

"… I have come to categorize myself as "your creative asset"— prepared to pursue any artistic objective that may come forward. Although it's a board description, this is the kind of artist I am."

Holman’s exhibit includes work he has done for www.aTylerHolmanProject.com, his personal business, and further features a personal project of concept art that was later generated into a book. The book portrays not only illustrations, but also creative writings produced by various authors. The book is available at www.aTylerHolmanProject.com.

His work has appeared in numerous exhibitions, both in galleries and online, and he's won numerous awards for his work.

"I love art," Holman said. "From creating sculptures to arranging text elements or whatever the objective may be, I find joy, and it's apparent."

Hey, Muskies, are you ready for a night of some rock & roll?

Join Lakeland faculty, staff, students and alumni for Lakeland Night on Thursday, Aug. 10, at the John Michael Kohler Arts Center in downtown Sheboygan during the Levitt AMP Sheboygan Music Series.

The first 100 people who visit the Lakeland tent who are wearing Lakeland University/College apparel will get a free drink ticket!

The headliner is the Banditos whose unique sound is a great mix of '60s blues-fused acid rock, ZZ Top's jangly boogie, garage punk, the Drive-By Truckers' yawp, the populist choogle of CCR, Slim Harpo's hip shake baby groove, the ebullient folk of electric Dylan, gut bucket Fat Possum hill country mojo and the Georgia Satellites. Check them out here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dKSC3-WLjYg.

The grounds open at 5:30 p.m. and the free show gets underway with Listening Party at 6 p.m. A variety of food trucks will provide plenty of dinner options. Learn more about the Levitt AMP series here: http://concerts.levittamp.org/sheboygan.

Help us celebrate summer, Muskies style!

J. Garland Schilcutt shakes hands with Dr. David Black

The Lakeland University Board of Trustees has approved establishing the J. Garland Schilcutt School of Business and Entrepreneurship at Lakeland University.

The board's action honors Schilcutt for nearly six decades of building and growing Lakeland's business programs, as well as teaching and mentoring many hundreds of Lakeland students.

Known affectionately as Prof to most who know him, Schilcutt arrived at Lakeland in January of 1958, and the Gary, Ind., native never left.

He retired from full-time teaching at Lakeland in 2015, having served 57 years, the longest tenure of any employee in the institution's history. He remains a Lakeland ambassador and he regularly consults Lakeland's advancement team.

"Students in the Schilcutt School will be challenged to demonstrate the habits of mind and character that this community has long observed in Prof Schilcutt," said Lakeland President David Black.

"Those include a knowledge of his discipline, his craft and the larger context in which they operate; an urbane awareness of the world combined with a deep sense of place in this, his home; an ethic that includes the golden rule in all matters; a subordination of self-interest to the common good and to the best interest of his students and Lakeland; and the dignity of his hard work."

Schilcutt created and sustained all of Lakeland's business-related academic programs. He was the true progenitor of the evening and off-campus programs, serving as dean for the program in the 1990s. He served as the first director of the Master of Business Administration program.

Schilcutt earned numerous awards and honors over the years, including winning the 1992 Underkofler Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching Award and being named an honorary Lakeland alumnus in 1988.

But his enormous academic and programmatic contributions to Lakeland were dwarfed by the impact he had on individual students. For years, Schilcutt lived on campus, teaching his classes by day, tutoring, mentoring and coaching by night, often until the early morning hours.

Officially both professor and resident director, he was a mentor, father figure, disciplinarian, confessor, advisor, counselor, advocate and friend.

"Today we market how, thanks to technology, Lakeland delivers access to education for students around the clock," Black said. "Prof has been doing this for almost six decades."

Some Lakeland graduates have expressed interest in establishing scholarships within the Schilcutt School. Those interested in contributing to this effort should contact Beth Borgen at or 920-565-1023 ext. 2152.

Amelia Fitzsimmons will join Lakeland's faculty this fall as an assistant professor of chemistry.

Fitzsimmons comes to Lakeland after working as a postdoctoral fellow in the scientific computing group at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, in Oak Ridge, Tenn. She is working as part of an interdisciplinary team of computational scientists to prepare scientific applications for the next supercomputer at ORNL. She is also pursuing research in the area of relativistic effects in heavy-element chemistry and quantum chemistry applications in modern programming languages.

Fitzsimmons has a background in physical and computational chemistry research and in teaching physical and general chemistry to undergraduate students.

After completing a doctorate in chemistry at the University of Alberta in 2014, she worked as an adjunct instructor at the University of British Columbia, Okanagan. While there, she developed curriculum for and taught upper level undergraduate chemistry courses.

She received a bachelor of science degree in chemistry from Oklahoma Christian University and has authored a number of published articles and presentations.

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