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Lakeland contingent presents at Marquette

August 24, 2016 In Lakeland University Blog
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Pictured, from left to right, are: back row – Paul Pickhardt, Jered McGivern, Suzette Rosas, Dorah Owango, Chad Larson, Charlotte Andreason, Gwen Schad and Greg Smith; front row – Maddy Doll, Brook Bignell, Jamie Gundlach and Brooke Wilder-Corrigan. Andreason and Schad are two of the three Sheboygan North High School students who participated in LURE this summer. Pictured, from left to right, are: back row – Paul Pickhardt, Jered McGivern, Suzette Rosas, Dorah Owango, Chad Larson, Charlotte Andreason, Gwen Schad and Greg Smith; front row – Maddy Doll, Brook Bignell, Jamie Gundlach and Brooke Wilder-Corrigan. Andreason and Schad are two of the three Sheboygan North High School students who participated in LURE this summer.
Seven Lakeland Undergraduate Research Experience (LURE) students capped a summer of intense experimentation when they presented their work at Marquette University last month.

It was the 13th year Lakeland has been included in Marquette’s annual summer research program, which this year featured about 50 research posters and presentations.

Following are the Lakeland University projects that were showcased:

  • “Metabolite Catabolism and Astrocyte Development Using Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells,” by Suzette Rosas, Jamie Gundlach and Jered McGivern

  • “Comparison of Muscle Fatigue in Dominant and Non-Dominant arms of Athletes and Non-Athletes,” Brook J. Bignell and Andrew S. Karls

  • “Assessing the Effects of Environmental pH on [PSI+] Prion Induction in Saccharomyces cerevisiae,” Madison C. Doll and Gregory R. Smith

  • “Examining the Localization and Trafficking of GluN1/GluN2C NMDA Receptors,” Dorah Owango and Andrew S. Karls

  • “Examining the Effects of Coal Fly Ash and Food Ration at the Molecular, Individual and Population Level in Daphnia magna,” Brooke L. Wilder-Corrigan, Madison K. Runge, Chad M. Larson, and Paul C. Pickhardt

“Our students develop these projects from inception and are responsible for everything, ranging from project design, experimentation, data collection, trouble shooting, data analysis and the final presentation,” said Greg Smith, Lakeland University professor of biology.

Lakeland LURE students are paid each summer for their research, earning wages for 400 hours of work over 10 weeks. There have been 78 LURE students, about a quarter of whom have gone on to professional schools all over the country. At least another quarter of those students are working full time in science-based professions.

“Professional schools and employers alike want to hire students with real laboratory experience,” Smith said. “The skills our students learn in our labs are highly transferrable, both to higher learning and the work force.”

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