Kodály Summer Graduate Music Program

June 26, 2022 - July 7, 2023

About The Program

Lakeland University is proud to add the Kodály Summer Graduate Music program to its offerings. The program will take place June 26 - July 7, 2023.

Previously housed at Holy Family College (Silver Lake College of the Holy Family), the Kodály Summer Graduate Music Program is designed for elementary, secondary, and independent music teachers who are seeking to grow their pedagogical, personal musicianship, and research skills. The program faculty are leaders in the field of music education and provide an experience that is joyful, supportive, and immensely meaningful.

The Kodály Summer Graduate Music program is efficient and is designed to complement the busy schedules of working music educators. Music educators can earn their Master of Music in Music Education – Kodály Emphasis degree in four summers, including an intensive two-week summer residency each summer, with limited online coursework throughout the academic year. Within the 34-credit program, students will also earn an OAKE endorsed Kodály Certificate. Most program participants work full or part-time during the academic year and immediately apply what they learn in the program to their teaching.

Graduate students also have the option to complete their OAKE endorsed Kodály Certificate in just three summers. This program takes place exclusively during a two-week summer residency for three summers and is 20 credits. Scholarships are available for graduate students in the Master of Music in Music Education – Kodály Emphasis degree and OAKE endorsed Kodály Certificate programs.

A variety of workshop courses are also offered without graduate credit and at a reduced rate.

About The Faculty

Dr. Franklin Gallo (b. 1977) was trained in piano, voice and trumpet from an early age. He holds a B.S. from Duquesne University, a Performance Certificate from the Ezio Pinza Council of American Singers of Opera (Italy), a M.M. from Shenandoah University, and a diploma from the Zoltán Kodály Pedagogical Institute of Music (Hungary), where he studied with Eva Vendrai and Péter Erdei, and a D.M.A. from The Hartt School, under the guidance of Edward Bolkovac.

Dr. Gallo has held faculty positions at Shepherd University, The Hartt School, and at DePaul University, as well as in numerous public schools. Dr. Gallo also served as summer faculty at DePaul University, Duquesne University, Westminster Choir College, Holy Family College, and now Lakeland University. At Lakeland, Dr. Gallo serves as the Chair of the Master of Music in Music Education – Kodály Emphasis program.

Dr. Gallo is in demand as a guest conductor, clinician, conference presenter and composer. The past recipient of the Organization of American Kodály Educators (OAKE) Ruth Boshkoff Composition Prize, Dr. Gallo's works are featured in the Ruth Dwyer Choral Series with Colla Voce Music, and in the Henry Leck Creating Artistry Series with the Hal Leonard Corporation.

Courses:

  • MU 631 Solfege III
  • MU 601 Choral Ensemble
  • MU 632 Choral Literature & Advanced Conduction

Dr. Brent Gault has taught elementary and early childhood music courses in Texas, Wisconsin, Connecticut, Pennsylvania, and Indiana. He specializes in elementary general music education, early childhood music education and Kodály-inspired methodology. Dr. Gault also has training in both the Orff and Dalcroze approaches to music education.

He has presented sessions and research at conferences of the American Orff-Shulwerk Association, the Dalcroze Society of America, the International Kodály Educators, and MENC: The National Association for Music Education. In addition, he has served as a presenter and guest lecturer for colleges and music education organizations in the United States and China.

Articles by Dr. Gault have been published in various music education periodicals, including the Bulletin of the Council for Research in Music Education, the Journal of Research in Music Education, Music Educators Journal, General Music today, the Kodály Envoy, the Orff Echo, and the American Dalcroze Journal.

In addition to his duties with the Music Education Department at Indiana University where he is an associate professor of music (music education) in the Jacobs School of Music, Dr. Gault serves as the program director for the Indiana University Children’s Choir where he conducts the Allegro Choir. He is a past president of the Organization of American Kodály Educators.

Courses:

  • MU 611 Solfege I
  • MU 621 Solfege II
  • MU 630 Kodály Methods III

Stephanie Schall-Brazee is an elementary general music teacher for the Traverse City Area Public Schools where she also directs the select Women’s Choir, Bella Voce. As a choral director, Stephanie’s choirs have consistently earned first-degree ratings at festivals and have been invited to sing at the Michigan Music Conference in Grand Rapids, Michigan. In addition to her public school teaching, Stephanie is on the faculty of the Northwest Michigan College Children’s Choirs where she directs the Lyric and Prelude choirs.

Stephanie’s training includes a Bachelor of Music Education Degree from Central Michigan University, and a Master of Music Education from The Hartt School, where she was a graduate assistant to Dr. John Feierabend. Stephanie’s master’s thesis, entitled “The Effects of Song Accompaniment on First-Grade Children’s Ability to Sing Songs from Memory,” required an experimental study that continues to be a clear contribution to the knowledge base in song acquisition among children.

In addition to her teaching, Stephanie has served as a clinician presenting sessions on “First Steps in Music,” “Singing Development in Young Children,” “Music and Movement in Preschool” and “Conversational Solfege.” She also is an endorsed Teacher Trainer for First Steps in Music, and Conversational Solfege Levels 1 and 2.”

Courses:

  • MU 610 Kodály Methods I
  • MU 620 Kodály Methods II
  • MU 600A First Steps in Music

Dr. Rachel Ware Carlton, Director of Graduate Music and Director of Advancement for the School of Humanities and Fine Arts at Lakeland University, is an award-winning soprano who has performed on the operatic and concert stage. She received her Doctor of Musical Arts and Master of Musical Arts degrees from the University of Minnesota and her Bachelor of Arts degree in music from Luther College. Dr. Ware Carlton has taught vocalists at the collegiate, secondary and elementary levels. Her articles on vocal pedagogy, private studio management and other topics have appeared in national publications. Prior to beginning her work at Lakeland University, Dr. Ware Carlton taught at Holy Family College in Manitowoc, WI, Luther College in Decorah, Iowa and the University of Minnesota - Twin Cities Campus.

Dr. Ware Carlton conducted a major survey of vocal pedagogues to assess the current use of science and imagery in vocal studios, and published her findings in the Journal of Singing. She has presented these findings at the CMS National Convention, the CMS Great Lakes Regional Conference, the Voice Foundation’s 40th Annual Symposium, the Phenomenon of Singing Symposium held in Newfoundland, Canada, and the Andover Educators Biennial Conference in Portland, Oregon.

Dr. Ware Carlton is a licensed Andover Educator and teaches the course “What Every Musician Needs to Know About the Body.” She is an in-demand guest presenter on Body Mapping throughout the Midwestern United States.

As director of the graduate music program, Dr. Ware Carlton serves as advisor to students in the Kodály Certificate Program and Master of Music in Music Education – Kodály Emphasis program.

Courses:

  • MU 710 Capstone Development
  • MU 790 Capstone
  • Voice Pedagogy for the Music Educator
  • Program Advisor

Lynne Zimmermann received both her Bachelor of Music Education and Master of Music education with Kodály emphasis from Holy Family College. Her master’s thesis was published in ERIC’s online database. Currently, she teaches K-4 general music in Plymouth, Wisconsin, maintains a private voice and piano studio, and directs the traditional and concert choirs at the Sheboygan Evangelical Free Church. Her community involvement includes accompanying students at district and state music festivals and she has been involved in a number of musical theater productions. She has been teaching online classes for Holy Family's Graduate Music Program since 2009 and will continue teaching these courses at Lakeland University.

Courses:

  • MU 650 History and Philosophy of Music Education
    • Alternates every odd year
  • MU 651 Current Perspectives in Music Education
    • Alternates every even year

Rachel is an Assistant Professor of Music Education at Illinois State University. Rachel has over fifteen years of experience teaching elementary general music. Her research interests, while varied, are centered in teaching music to students with disabilities. Rachel is the co-author of three publications; First Steps in Music with Orff Schulwerk, Conversational Recorder, and also has been published in the Orff Echo, Journal of Music Teacher Education, and most recently Research Studies in Music Education. Rachel is fully certified in Feierabend, Kodály, Orff, and holds GIML Elementary I and II certificates. Rachel is a member of AERA, AOSA, GIML, NAfME, and ECMMA. She lives with her husband and two children in Bloomington, Illinois.

Courses:

  • MU 690 Research in Music Education

Adam Kruse is Associate Professor of Music Education at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign where he teaches music education courses primarily in areas of popular music and music technology. He is a co-leader for the Hip-Hop Xpress project and also co-directs the Illinois School of Music's Summer Hip-Hop Camp. Kruse completed his Ph.D. in music education at Michigan State University and earned a Master of Arts degree in secondary education and a Bachelor of Science degree in music education from Ball State University. As a graduate student, Kruse earned an Excellence in Diversity Award, a Research Enhancement Award, and a Dissertation Completion Fellowship. His dissertation titled, "'They Wasn't Makin' My Kinda Music': Hip-Hop, Schooling, and Music Education," won the 2014 Outstanding Dissertation Award from the Council for Research in Music Education. Kruse's current scholarship focuses on Hip-Hop music learning and engagements of Hip-Hop culture in school music settings. He presents frequently at national and international conferences and has published in many of the field's leading journals.

At the University of Illinois, Kruse earned a Campus Distinguished Promotion Award in 2021 and the 2019-2020 Faculty Award for Excellence in Teaching from the College of Fine + Applied Arts. He also received a Creative Research Award from the College and an M3I4 grant from the School of Music to host the first-ever Hip-Hop Music Ed Symposium. Kruse was also recognized with the 2020 Outstanding Early Career Paper in Music Education from the American Educational Research Association and a 2017-2018 Technology Initiative Award from the College Music Society. The Hip-Hop Xpress project that Kruse co-leads with Dr. William Patterson and others has been awarded grants from the University's Presidential Initiative to Celebrate the Impact of the Arts and the Humanities; the Student Sustainability Committee; and the Office of the Vice-Chancellor for Diversity, Equity & Inclusion's Call to Action to Address Racism and Social Injustice. This project also earned the 2021 Campus Excellence in Public Engagement award.

Courses:

  • Exploring Hip-Hop Music Pedagogy

Lamont Holden, known in the music production community as TheLetterLBeats, is a music producer, DJ, podcast host, videographer, social media content creator, sound designer, teacher and audio engineer. Returning to campus after four years in Atlanta, GA at the pulse of the music industry, he will continue teaching Beatmaking I & II, Critical Audio Listening and Audio Recording Techniques.

During the fall 202 semester, Professor Holden is helped to launch the “Illini Anthem” project that combines hip hop music and culture with new athletic and school spirit traditions at UIUC. Professor Holden is leading the School of Music in expanding the Hip Hop Music and Music Production program.

Professor Holden earned his B.A. from the University of Illinois in 2004 and an M.A. in Teaching & Education at National Louis University in 2011.

Courses:

  • Exploring Hip-Hop Music Pedagogy

Manju Durairaj was born and raised in India. She studied in Pune, India. She was involved in graduate research projects on comparative pedagogical practices of Indian (Carnatic) and Western Music at Middlesex University, London, UK. She graduated with her second master’s degree and K-12 certification from VanderCook College of Music, Chicago.

Manju is the Lower School Music Teacher at the Latin School of Chicago. She is president elect for ILMEA elementary general music division, vice president-elect DEI of AOSA, past president of the Greater Chicago Orff Chapter and is a certified Orff Schulwerk Levels Teacher Instructor. She is a certified Arts Integration specialist. She is an adjunct professor at VanderCook College of Music, Chicago where she teaches curriculum design and elementary methods graduate and undergraduate courses. Her continuing teaching education courses, on campus and online, include Culturally Responsive Music Education, Technology, Arts Integration, Curriculum Development, Responsive Classroom, and Redesigning Teaching and Learning for 21st Century.

She is a frequent clinician at various state, national, and international conferences. She has been published in the Orff Echo, Reverberations, Illinois Music Educators Journal, General Music Today, and the Journal of the Council for Research in Music Education. Her publications with Hal Leonard include InterAct with Music Assessment Levels 1 and 2, InterAct Levels 1&2 Student Activities for Devices and Print, Technology in Today’s Music Classroom and Dancing Around the World with Music Express Magazine.

Courses:

  • 21st Century Orff Schulwerk: Making Responsive Teaching and Collaborative Learning Visible

Carol Storck is the Director of Music and Choir Director at Holy Trinity Catholic Church in Newburg, WI, teaches piano and voice lessons to children in her home music studio, and is a member of Collegium Ladyes, a women’s a cappella ensemble in Milwaukee under the direction of Jenny Gettel. A certified music teacher, Ms. Storck has taught general music and choir in the Milwaukee, Manitowoc, and Sheboygan areas, including elementary, middle, and high school. She has also taught infant, toddler, and early childhood music classes, and directed children’s choirs for the Milwaukee Children’s Choir, Silver Lake Children’s Choir, Holy Family Conservatory of Music, and St. Francis Borgia Church in Cedarburg. In 2010, she received the Civic Music Association Award for Excellence in Youth Music Instruction in Milwaukee, and in 2013, she received the Alumni Award for Excellence in the Fine Arts from Silver Lake College. She taught courses including Solfege and Music Education Methods classes to undergraduate and graduate students at Silver Lake College (Holy Family College), and is excited to teach Solfege I at Lakeland University’s Kodaly Summer Graduate Music Program. Carol has a Bachelor of Music from the University of Wisconsin- Madison and a Master of Music with a Kodaly emphasis from Silver Lake College (Holy Family College).

Courses:

  • Solfege I

Jonathan C. Rappaport is Executive Director Emeritus of Arts|Learning (Hanover, MA), a statewide non-profit organization that advocates for and promotes arts education and systemic education reform, and the Co-Founder/Director emeritus of the Kodály Music Institute, Boston, MA, (founded 1998) where he teaches conducting and advanced pedagogy and materials analysis. Jonathan is the former Head of School, Conservatory Lab Charter School (Brighton, MA), and the Performing Arts Liaison of the Worcester (MA) Public Schools. He is a conductor, educator, composer, pianist, singer, author, and consultant for school systems. He has served as the choral director of numerous schools, children’s festival honor choirs, churches, synagogues, and community choral groups. Rappaport has published 20 choral works and 5 books, and is the recipient of several awards for his work advocating for the arts in public schools from the MA Music Educators, the MA Alliance for Arts Education, the New England Theatre Conference, the MA Art Educators Association, and the Organization of American Kodály Educators (Lifetime Achievement Award). He has taught music, trained teachers nationally, presented at national and state conferences in over a dozen states, and directed choruses for 45 years. He served on the panels that wrote both the 1999 and 2019 Massachusetts Arts Curriculum Framework. Jonathan’s biography appears in past editions of the International Who's Who in Music and Who's Who in America. Graduate study has included work towards a PhD at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst (ABD), M.M. from New England Conservatory, and a Kodály Certificate from the Franz Liszt Academy, Budapest, Hungary.

Courses:

  • MU 612: Folk Song History and Analysis I and II

3 Options

Summer Graduate Music Program

The Summer Graduate Music Program at Lakeland University offers three options depending on your needs:

  • Master of Music in Music Education - Kodály Emphasis
  • Kodály Certificate - OAKE Endorsed
  • Continuing Education Workshop Courses
Apply Now!
Questions? Contact us!
Folk dancing in class
Choir

Master of Music in Music Education with a Kodály Emphasis (MM)

This degree is 34 credits and includes four summers with two weeks on campus each summer. Students also earn an OAKE-endorsed Kodály certificate as part of this program (Levels I-III). Your first summer would include the following courses: Kodály Methods I (includes the First Steps of Music curriculum), Solfege I, Folk Song History and Research I, Choir, and a Special Topics course. Students usually take 7.5-9 credits each summer.

To be considered for admission into the Master of Music in Music Education Program at Lakeland University, an applicant must submit:

  • Completed Application for admission form and $50 non – refundable fee at: http://lakeland.edu/apply
  • All official transcripts from accredited institutions of higher education indicating completion of a baccalaureate degree with a minimum cumulative grade point average (GPA) of 2.75 on a 4.00-point scale (undergrad & graduate). Students with a GPA of a 2.5-2.74 should contact advisor to discuss available options. Official transcripts from any accredited college transferring courses into your bachelor's degree will also be needed.
  • Two letters of recommendation indicating the applicant’s potential for success in the graduate program. Master of Music in Music Education applicants must use the program-specific form.
  • Current resume
  • Personal statement
  • An entrance interview (advisor will contact you to set this up)

Submit all materials to:

Lakeland University – Sheboygan Center
Jane Bouche
W3718 South Drive, Plymouth WI, 53073
boucheja@lakeland.edu

Apply Now

For new students, the program director, Dr. Franklin Gallo, will contact you following completion of your application process to assist with registration.

Returning students may login to my.lakeland.edu to register for classes. Please contact Dr. Franklin Gallo (gallof@lakeland.edu) for advising assistance and help with registration.

Registration for classes beginning in Summer 2022 will open February 8, 2022.

Benchmark Requirements:

Students will need to complete the following Benchmark Requirements before they are permitted to register for 9 or more program credits (Students will typically complete these requirements before their second summer in the program):

  1. Music History/Theory Requirement: Students will complete Music History and Music Theory examinations during their first summer of study. To fulfill this requirement, students must either pass Music History and Music Theory examinations OR by taking the Music History and/or Music Theory Review course(s) before graduation. NOTE: Credits earned in the Music History and/or Music Theory review course(s) will not count toward degree program, but rather will serve to satisfy this benchmark requirement.
  2. Performance Exam: to be completed on campus within the first year of attendance. You will complete your performance exam on your major performing instrument/voice before Lakeland University Graduate Music faculty. The performance exam will evaluate basic musicianship and technique on your major performing instrument/voice. Each exam will consist of:
    1. Vocal Audition – one art song/aria in English and one art song/aria in a foreign language
    2. Piano Audition – two selections from contrasting musical periods and styles
    3. Instrumental Audition – two selections of contrasting musical periods and styles
  3. Teaching Demonstration: Submission of video demonstrating a typical class session. Videos are typically 15-20 minutes in length and may be submitted as a link to a recording.
  4. Conducting Demonstration: Provide a link to a recording of you conducting within a performance, classroom or rehearsal setting. Your conducting demonstration may be submitted as a link to a recording. If you do not have access to an ensemble, arrangements can be made for you to complete this requirement on campus within the first year of your attendance. The conducing demonstration should include two chorales, one in ¾ and one in 4/4, or equivalent literature. Music may be performed by a choir or an instrumental ensemble. You will be evaluated based upon the following criteria:
    1. Clear preparatory beats
    2. Clear beat patterns
    3. Fermatas properly execute
    4. Concise cut-offs
June 26 – July 7

8:00-10:00 a.m.

  • MU 630 Kodály Methods III [2]
  • MU 621 Solfege II [2]
  • MU 612 Folk Song History and Research I [2]

10:15 a.m.-12:15 p.m.

  • MU 620 Kodály Methods II [2]
  • MU 611 Solfege I [2]
  • MU 631 Solfege III [2]

1:15-2:15 p.m.

  • MU 601 Choral Ensemble [0/1]

2:30-4:30 p.m.

  • MU 610 Kodály Methods I [2]
  • MU 632 Choral Literature & Advanced Conducting [2]
  • MU 622 Folk Song History and Research II [2]
  • MU 710 Capstone Development – By Appointment
May 23 – August 12
  • MU 790 Capstone/Thesis Project [1-3]
June 13 – July 22 
  • MU 690 Research in Music Education
    • Hybrid course with in-person classes June 27 - July 8
June 27 – August 12
  • MU 651 Current Perspectives in Music Education

SPECIAL TOPICS COURSES

Each special topics course may be taken for graduate credit or as a workshop for no credit

Saturday & Sunday, June 24-25

8:00 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.

  • MU 680A – Exploring Hip-Hop Music Pedagogy taught by Lamont Holden and Dr. Adam Kruse
Monday-Thursday, June 26-June 29

5:00-8:45 p.m.

  • MU 680B - Voice Pedagogy for the Music Educator taught by Dr. Rachel Ware Carlton
Monday-Thursday, July 3-6

5:00 p.m. - 8:45 p.m.

  • MU 680C - 21st Century Orff Schulwerk: Making Responsive Teaching and Collaborative Learning Visible taught by Manju Durairaj
Monday, July 10 – Friday, July 21

MU 610 Kodály Methods I 
2 Graduate Credits
Stephanie Schall-Brazee

During this course, participants will be introduced to current research findings and the implications of that research on the development of an early childhood music and movement curriculum. Materials and activities will be presented for children from birth to age 7. Collecting materials, designing teaching strategies, lesson plans and yearly curriculum, as well as developing and promoting an early childhood program, will be covered. Active participation in both music and movement activities will be the basis for most instruction.

MU 620 Kodály Methods II
2 Graduate Credits
TBD

Conversational Solfege is a pedagogical method that develops musical literacy. Based on models used to teach conversational foreign languages, Conversational Solfege develops an understanding of music through the use of rhythm syllables and Solfege syllables at the conversational level, then gradually evolves into traditional notation. Through carefully sequenced activities, Conversational Solfege enables students to joyfully assimilate the skills and content necessary to be musically literate. Through various techniques, Conversational Solfege allows the acquisition of musical reading and writing, dictation, improvisation and composition in an intuitive manner. This course is applicable to general music, choral and instrumental teachers.

MU 630 Kodály Methods III
2 Graduate Credits
TBD

This course further explores the development of musical literacy through analyzing songs and creating a sequence of learning based on song content and skill development. Strategies include listening, reading, writing, writing lesson plans and establishing yearly goals. This course also will give you an introduction of how to teach harmonic function in major and minor tonalities as they apply to improvisation and composition.

MU 611 Solfege I
2 Graduate Credits
Dr. Brent Gault

Introduction to the use of Kodály techniques applied to development of skills in use of relative solmization and rhythmic syllables, aural perception, singing and conducting.

MU 621 Solfege II
2 Graduate Credits
Dr. Brent Gault

Advanced study in Kodály techniques related to relative solmization, aural perception, modulation, singing, conducting, and part work.

MU 631 Solfege III
2 Graduate Credits
Dr. Franklin Gallo

In Solfege III, the aural, visual and kinesthetic skills of effective music educators and conductors are presented and practiced using techniques developed by Guido d’Arezzo, John Curwen, Zoltán Kodály and others. Through studying solmization, students develop and connect their analytical knowledge of music theory to their aural comprehension. Sequentially derived exercises, extracted excerpts and authentic in-class performances advance student understanding. The practice of moveable-Do (la-based minor) solmization helps students to unpack diverse repertoire from American and European Folk heritages, the Western Art cannon and world music. Topics to be discussed include linear pentatonic, diatonic and modal sight-singing, vertical harmonic solmization and aural analysis, interval recognition, piano and vocal performance proficiency, authentic performance practice of monophonic, polyphonic, and homophonic works, and two-, three- and four-part homophony and polyphony.

MU 612 Folk Song History and Research I
2 Graduate Credits
Jonathan Rappaport

In this course, emphasis is placed on the historical and cultural contexts of folk songs of the United States. Students study the work of various folk song collectors’ field recordings and primary source collections. Specific folk song types as well as regional and cultural folk song characteristics are studied. Students also begin work on folk song transcription and creating a basic folk song index-retrieval system.

MU 622 Folk Song History and Research II
2 Graduate Credits
TBD

This course is a continuation of Folk Song Research Level I. In this course, students continue to study folk songs in historical and cultural contexts. Students also focus on detailed folk song analysis techniques and apply them to a personal folk song collection. The students also work on more specific details of their index-retrieval system for subsequent application of folk songs to a music curriculum.

MU 601 Choral Chamber Ensemble
0/1 Graduate Credit
Dr. Franklin Gallo

The Choral Performing Ensemble meets daily, rehearsing, and performing music of diverse genres and styles. The ensemble also serves as a pedagogical lab for participants that focuses on building musicianship and conducting skills. Registration is required of all graduate students enrolled in Kodály programs.

MU 690 Research in Music Education
3 Graduate Credits
Dr. Rachel Grimbsy

This course covers the major paradigms and methods typically used in research conducted in music education. Research can help inform curricular decisions, help our pedagogical practices to be more effective, as well as help enrich students’ experiences with music. Provides a foundation for conducting research for the thesis project, or provides foundation for teachers to conduct research within their classrooms. Further, it will help students understand challenges facing contemporary music education research, how research can inform practice, and how research studies may serve as a springboard for future advanced work in the field of music education. In addition, it is designed to help develop strategies to read and critique research, and to learn how to conduct a qualitative research study.

MU 650 History and Philosophy of Music Education
2 Graduate Credits
Lynne Zimmermann

General learning theories, aesthetics of music and curricular design in music education in the United States from historical and philosophical perspectives.

MU 651 Current Perspectives in Music Education
2 Graduate Credits
Lynne Zimmermann

Approaches to current music curriculum designs with accompanying socio-cultural trends affecting curricular theory and practices. Basic study of Kodály, Orff, Dalcroze, CMP and Manhattanville approaches and recent symposia findings relating to music education.

MU 632 Advanced Conducting & Choral Literature
2 Graduate Credits
Dr. Franklin Gallo

Students are introduced to and develop precise conducting skills and rehearsal techniques needed to successfully lead choral ensembles. During this course, students will explore advanced literature useful for select children's choruses, high school choruses, and/or adult choirs.

MUS 690 Capstone Project/Thesis
0-3 Graduate Credits
Dr. Franklin Gallo

Capstone Projects which cover three content areas selected from Pedagogy, Musicianship, Folk Song Materials, History and Research, Historical Foundations, Current Perspectives, and Research in Music Education will be completed. Students will present their work and complete a Capstone Presentation and Oral Examination.

SPECIAL TOPICS:

MU 680A - Exploring Hip-Hop Music Pedagogy
1 Graduate Credit OR 0 Credit Workshop
Lamont Holden, Dr. Adam Kruse

Exploring Hip-Hop Music Pedagogy will engage attendees in a variety of activities centered on Hip-Hop music and culture. From sampling and beatmaking to freestyling and lyric writing, we will create and perform original music with an emphasis on individual expression. We will also explore foundational concepts in Hip-Hop culture and develop critical considerations for contemporary classroom practice.


MU 680B - Voice Pedagogy for the Music Educator
1 Graduate Credit
Dr. Rachel Ware Carlton

Course description coming soon.

MU 680C - 21st Century Orff Schulwerk: Making Responsive Teaching and Collaborative Learning Visible
0/1 Graduate Credit
Manju Durairaj

The Orff Schulwerk approach is one of the most sustainable practices in music education. It adapts and evolves with the times, without compromising child centered and child generated learning outcomes, even in a pandemic. This session illustrates the Orff Schulwerk approach using cultural information and processes to scaffold learning, emphasizes communal orientation, and focusing on relationships, cognitive scaffolding, and critical social awareness. This session provides ideas for using award winning books to design lessons and assessments that are framed in culturally responsive teaching, implementing purposeful inclusion strategies for collaborative learning, designing differentiated performance tasks to evoke creativity and higher order thinking skill, creating meaningful rubrics that assess learning, and structure feedback for growth and proficiency.


MU 605A
3 Graduate Credits
Manju Durairaj,
Cyndee Giebler

Course participants will develop their personal musicianship skills, learn to create stylistically and age-appropriate arrangements, and experience pedagogical models appropriate for the elementary and middle school classroom that emphasize improvisation and creativity. This approach stresses the importance of developing the child’s body, ear, and mind as an integrated pathway to creative expression and comprehensive musicianship.

1 credit courses - $687
  • MUS 560 Choral Ensemble
  • MUS 690 Capstone Project
  • MUS 510A Culturally Responsive Teaching for Music Educators
  • MUS 510B Folk Song and Dance Around the World
  • MUS 510C Check back in October for course title!
2 credit courses - $1,374
  • MUS 542 Kodály Methods I
  • MUS 543 Kodály Methods II
  • MUS 544 Kodály Methods III
  • MUS 501 Folk Song History and Research I
  • MUS 502 Folk Song History and Research II
  • MUS 522 Solfege I
  • MUS 523 Solfege II
  • MUS 531 Solfege III
  • MUS 644 Choral Literature & Advanced Conducting
  • MUS 630 History and Philosophy of Music Education

3 credit courses - $2,061

  • MUS 500 Research in Music Education
Workshop fees (NOTE: No graduate credit is earned if you register for the courses listed below for 0 credits)
  • MUS 530A First Steps in Music - $420
  • MUS 530B Conversational Solfege – Lower Levels - $420
  • MUS 530C Conversational Solfege – Upper Levels - $420
  • MUS 510A Culturally Responsive Teaching for Music Educators - $210
  • MUS 510B Folk Song and Dance Around the World - $210
  • MUS 510C Check back in October for course title! - $210
  • MUS 560 Choral Ensemble - $30


Tuition and fees are due two weeks prior to the start of the semester.

Scholarships are available for students within the Master of Music in Music Education – Kodály Emphasis program and the OAKE Endorsed Kodály Certificate program.

The Master of Music in Music Education – Kodály Emphasis degree program is financial aid eligible.

Kodaly Summer Graduate Music Scholarships

Lakeland University awards multiple scholarships each year for students who have been accepted to either the Kodaly Certificate program or the Master of Music in Music Education: Kodaly Emphasis program. Scholarships are applied each summer a student registers for no less than six graduate credits that are applicable to program completion. Students who receive a scholarship will not need to reapply each summer, provided that they continue to meet the eligibility requirements listed below. (NOTE: Students who have less than six credits remaining in the program during their fourth summer of study in the Master of Music in Music Education – Kodaly Emphasis program may receive a prorated scholarship for their final summer of study.)

Scholarship Eligibility

To be and remain eligible a for an award, an accepted student must enroll in no less than six graduate credits that are applicable to program completion in the summer, have earned at least a 3.0 from their undergraduate institution, and maintain a record of academic excellence at Lakeland University with a GPA of no lower than a 3.0. Awards will renew automatically each summer so long as the eligibility requirements listed above continue to be met.

Scholarship Application Process

To apply for a degree, please complete the following steps:

  1. Application: Submit your application online by June 1, 2023.
  2. Recommendation: One recommendation form is required to complete your application. Please have your recommender fill out an online recommendation form by June 1, 2023. You must provide the e-mail address of your recommender as a part of our online application.

MASTER OF MUSIC IN MUSIC EDUCATION – KODÁLY EMPHASIS COURSES

  • MU 610 Kodály Methods I [2]
  • MU 620 Kodály Methods II [2]
  • MU 630 Kodály Methods III [2]
  • MU 611 Solfege I [2]
  • MU 621 Solfege II [2]
  • MU 631 Solfege III [2]
  • MU 612 Folk Song History and Research I [2]
  • MU 622 Folk Song History and Research II [2]
  • MU 632 Choral Literature and Advanced Conducting [2]
  • MU 650 History and Philosophy of Music Education (online) [2]
  • MU 651 Current Perspectives in Music Education (online) [2]
  • MU 690 Research in Music Education [3]
  • MU 601 Choral Ensemble* [0/1]
  • MU 680 Special Topics [4]
  • MU 710 Capstone Development [0]
  • MU 790 Capstone Project/Thesis [3]

* Choir must be taken for four summers, total 2 credits. Two summers will be taken for 1 credit, two summers will be taken for 0 credits.

TOTAL: 34 credits

Instructor dancing in class

Kodály Certificate

Endorsed by OAKE, the certificate is 20.5 credits and can be completed in three summers with two weeks on campus. Students usually take 6.5-7.5 credits each summer.

For new students, the program director, Dr. Franklin Gallo, will contact you following completion of your application process to assist with registration.

Returning students may login to my.lakeland.edu to register for classes. Please contact Dr. Franklin Gallo (gallof@lakeland.edu) for advising assistance and help with registration.

Registration for classes beginning in Summer 2023 will open Feb. 8, 2023!

June 26 – July 7

8:00-10:00 a.m.

  • MU 631 Kodály Methods III [2]
  • MU 621 Solfege II [2]
  • MU 612 Folk Song History and Research I [2]

10:15 a.m.-12:15 p.m.

  • MU 620 Kodály Methods II [2]
  • MU 621 Solfege I [2]
  • MU 631 Solfege III [2]

1:15-2:15 p.m.

  • MU 601 Choral Ensemble [0/1]

2:30-4:30 p.m.

  • MU 610 Kodály Methods I [2]
  • MU 632 Choral Literature & Advanced Conducting [2]
  • MU 622 Folk Song History and Research II [2]

SPECIAL TOPICS COURSES

Each special topics course may be taken for graduate credit or as a workshop for no credit. A total of one special topics credit is required to complete the Kodály Certificate program.

Saturday & Sunday, June 24-25

8:00 a.m.-4:30 p.m.

  • MU 680A — Exploring Hip-Hop Music Pedagogy taught by Lamont Holden and Dr. Adam Kruse
Monday-Thursday, June 26-39

5:00-8:45 p.m.

  • MU 680B — Voice Pedagogy for the Music Educator taught by Dr. Rachel Ware Carlton
Monday-Thursday, July 3-6

5:00 p.m. - 8:45 p.m.

  • MU 680C — 21st Century Orff Schulwerk: Making Responsive Teaching and Collaborative Learning Visible taught by Manju Durairaj
Monday, July 10 – Friday, July 21

MU 610 Kodály Methods I 
2 Graduate Credits
Stephanie Schall-Brazee

During this course, participants will be introduced to current research findings and the implications of that research on the development of an early childhood music and movement curriculum. Materials and activities will be presented for children from birth to age 7. Collecting materials, designing teaching strategies, lesson plans and yearly curriculum, as well as developing and promoting an early childhood program, will be covered. Active participation in both music and movement activities will be the basis for most instruction.


MU 620 Kodály Methods II
2 Graduate Credits
Stephanie Schall-Brazee

Conversational Solfege is a pedagogical method that develops musical literacy. Based on models used to teach conversational foreign languages, Conversational Solfege develops an understanding of music through the use of rhythm syllables and Solfege syllables at the conversational level, then gradually evolves into traditional notation. Through carefully sequenced activities, Conversational Solfege enables students to joyfully assimilate the skills and content necessary to be musically literate. Through various techniques, Conversational Solfege allows the acquisition of musical reading and writing, dictation, improvisation and composition in an intuitive manner. This course is applicable to general music, choral and instrumental teachers.


MU 630 Kodály Methods III
2 Graduate Credits
Brent Gault

This course further explores the development of musical literacy through analyzing songs and creating a sequence of learning based on song content and skill development. Strategies include listening, reading, writing, writing lesson plans and establishing yearly goals. This course also will give you an introduction of how to teach harmonic function in major and minor tonalities as they apply to improvisation and composition.


MU 611 Solfege I
2 Graduate Credits
Dr. Brent Gault

Introduction to the use of Kodály techniques applied to development of skills in use of relative solmization and rhythmic syllables, aural perception, singing and conducting.


MU 621 Solfege II
2 Graduate Credits
Dr. Brent Gault

Advanced study in Kodály techniques related to relative solmization, aural perception, modulation, singing, conducting, and part work.


MU 631 Solfege III
2 Graduate Credits
Dr. Franklin Gallo

In Solfege III, the aural, visual and kinesthetic skills of effective music educators and conductors are presented and practiced using techniques developed by Guido d’Arezzo, John Curwen, Zoltán Kodály and others. Through studying solmization, students develop and connect their analytical knowledge of music theory to their aural comprehension. Sequentially derived exercises, extracted excerpts and authentic in-class performances advance student understanding. The practice of moveable-Do (la-based minor) solmization helps students to unpack diverse repertoire from American and European Folk heritages, the Western Art cannon and world music. Topics to be discussed include linear pentatonic, diatonic and modal sight-singing, vertical harmonic solmization and aural analysis, interval recognition, piano and vocal performance proficiency, authentic performance practice of monophonic, polyphonic, and homophonic works, and two-, three- and four-part homophony and polyphony.


MU 612 Folk Song History and Research I
2 Graduate Credits
Jonathan Rappaport

In this course, emphasis is placed on the historical and cultural contexts of folk songs of the United States. Students study the work of various folk song collectors’ field recordings and primary source collections. Specific folk song types as well as regional and cultural folk song characteristics are studied. Students also begin work on folk song transcription and creating a basic folk song index-retrieval system.


MU 622 Folk Song History and Research II
2 Graduate Credits
TBD

This course is a continuation of Folk Song Research Level I. In this course, students continue to study folk songs in historical and cultural contexts. Students also focus on detailed folk song analysis techniques and apply them to a personal folk song collection. The students also work on more specific details of their index-retrieval system for subsequent application of folk songs to a music curriculum.


MU 601 Choral Chamber Ensemble
0/1 Graduate Credit
Dr. Franklin Gallo

The Choral Performing Ensemble meets daily, rehearsing, and performing music of diverse genres and styles. The ensemble also serves as a pedagogical lab for participants that focuses on building musicianship and conducting skills. Registration is required of all graduate students enrolled in Kodály programs.


MU 632 Advanced Conducting & Choral Literature
2 Graduate Credits
Dr. Franklin Gallo

Students are introduced to and develop precise conducting skills and rehearsal techniques needed to successfully lead choral ensembles. During this course, students will explore advanced literature useful for select children's choruses, high school choruses, and/or adult choirs.


SPECIAL TOPICS

MU 680A – Exploring Hip-Hop Music Pedagogy
1 Graduate Credit
Lamont Holden, Dr. Adam Kruse

Exploring Hip-Hop Music Pedagogy will engage attendees in a variety of activities centered on Hip-Hop music and culture. From sampling and beatmaking to freestyling and lyric writing, we will create and perform original music with an emphasis on individual expression. We will also explore foundational concepts in Hip-Hop culture and develop critical considerations for contemporary classroom practice.


MU 680B – Voice Pedagogy for the Music Educator
1 Graduate Credit
Dr. Rachel Ware Carlton

Course description coming soon.


MU 680C – 21st Century Orff Schulwerk: Making Responsive Teaching and Collaborative Learning Visible
0/1 Graduate Credit
Manju Durairaj

The Orff Schulwerk approach is one of the most sustainable practices in music education. It adapts and evolves with the times, without compromising child centered and child generated learning outcomes, even in a pandemic. This session illustrates the Orff Schulwerk approach using cultural information and processes to scaffold learning, emphasizes communal orientation, and focusing on relationships, cognitive scaffolding, and critical social awareness. This session provides ideas for using award winning books to design lessons and assessments that are framed in culturally responsive teaching, implementing purposeful inclusion strategies for collaborative learning, designing differentiated performance tasks to evoke creativity and higher order thinking skill, creating meaningful rubrics that assess learning, and structure feedback for growth and proficiency.


MU 605A Orff Schulwerk Cert-Level I
0/3 Graduate Credits
Manju Durairaj,
Cyndee Giebler

Course participants will develop their personal musicianship skills, learn to create stylistically and age-appropriate arrangements, and experience pedagogical models appropriate for the elementary and middle school classroom that emphasize improvisation and creativity. This approach stresses the importance of developing the child’s body, ear, and mind as an integrated pathway to creative expression and comprehensive musicianship.

1 credit courses - $687
  • MU 601 Choral Ensemble
  • MU 690 Research in Music Education
  • MU 790 Capstone Project
  • MU 680A — Exploring Hip-Hop Music Pedagogy
  • MU 680B — Voice Pedagogy for the Music Educator
  • MU 680C — 21st Century Orff Schulwerk: Making Responsive Teaching and Collaborative Learning Visible

2 credit courses - $1,374
  • MU 610 Kodály Methods I
  • MU 620 Kodály Methods II
  • MU 630 Kodály Methods III
  • MU 612 Folk Song History and Research I
  • MU 622 Folk Song History and Research II
  • MU 611 Solfege I
  • MU 621 Solfege II
  • MU 631 Solfege III
  • MU 632 Choral Literature & Advanced Conducting
  • MU 650 History and Philosophy of Music Education
Workshop fees (NOTE: No graduate credit is earned if you register for the courses listed below for 0 credits)
  • MU 600A First Steps in Music - $420
  • MU 600B Conversational Solfege – Lower Levels - $420
  • MU 600C Conversational Solfege – Upper Levels - $420
  • MU 605A Culturally Responsive Teaching for Music Educators - $210
  • M 605B Folk Song and Dance Around the World - $210
  • MU 605C Check back in October for course title! - $210
  • MU 601 Choral Ensemble - $30


Tuition and fees are due two weeks prior to the start of the semester.

Scholarships are available for students within the Master of Music in Music Education – Kodály Emphasis program and the OAKE Endorsed Kodály Certificate program.

The Kodály Certificate program is not financial aid eligible.

Kodaly Summer Graduate Music Scholarships

Lakeland University awards multiple scholarships each year for students who have been accepted to either the Kodaly Certificate program or the Master of Music in Music Education: Kodaly Emphasis program. Scholarships are applied each summer a student registers for no less than six graduate credits that are applicable to program completion. Students who receive a scholarship will not need to reapply each summer, provided that they continue to meet the eligibility requirements listed below. (NOTE: Students who have less than six credits remaining in the program during their fourth summer of study in the Master of Music in Music Education – Kodaly Emphasis program may receive a prorated scholarship for their final summer of study.)

Scholarship Eligibility

To be and remain eligible a for an award, an accepted student must enroll in no less than six graduate credits that are applicable to program completion in the summer, have earned at least a 3.0 from their undergraduate institution, and maintain a record of academic excellence at Lakeland University with a GPA of no lower than a 3.0. Awards will renew automatically each summer so long as the eligibility requirements listed above continue to be met.

Scholarship Application Process

To apply for a degree, please complete the following steps:

  1. Application: Submit your application online by June 1, 2023.
  2. Recommendation: One recommendation form is required to complete your application. Please have your recommender fill out an online recommendation form by June 1, 2023. You must provide the e-mail address of your recommender as a part of our online application.

KODÁLY CERTIFICATE COURSES

  • MU 610 Kodály Methods I [2]
  • MU 620 Kodály Methods II [2]
  • MU 630 Kodály Methods III [2]
  • MU 611 Solfege I [2]
  • MU 621 Solfege II [2]
  • MU 631 Solfege III [2]
  • MU 612 Folk Song History and Research I [2]
  • MU 622 Folk Song History and Research II [2]
  • MU 632 Choral Literature and Advanced Conducting [2]
  • MU 601 Choral Ensemble* [0/1]
  • MU 680 Special Topics [1]

*Choir must be taken for three summers, one summer for 1 credits, two summers for 0 credits.

TOTAL: 20 credits

Choir

Workshop Courses

This option provides the chance to take select classes for a reduced rate, but no graduate credit is given. 2023 Workshop courses include:

  • First Steps in Music (cross-listed with Kodály Methods I and meets at the same time and place)
  • Conversational Solfege – Lower Levels (cross-listed with Kodály Methods II and meets at the same time and place)
  • Conversational Solfege – Upper Levels (cross-listed with Kodály Methods III and meets at the same time and place)
  • Orff Schulwerk Level I Certification
  • ...AND MORE! Details coming soon. 

For new students, the program director, Dr. Franklin Gallo, will contact you following completion of your application process to assist with registration.

Returning students may login to my.lakeland.edu to register for classes. Please contact Dr. Franklin Gallo (gallof@lakeland.edu) for advising assistance and help with registration.

Registration for classes beginning in Summer 2023 will open Feb. 8, 2023!

Saturday & Sunday, June 24-25

8:00 a.m.-4:30 p.m.

  • MU 680A TBD

June 27 – July 8

8:00-10:00 a.m.

  • MU 600C Conversational Solfege – Upper Levels*

10:15 a.m.-12:15 p.m.

  • MUS 503B Conversational Solfege – Lower Levels*

1:15-2:15 p.m.

  • MUS 560 Choral Ensemble [0/1]

2:30-4:30 p.m.

  • MUS 503A First Steps in Music*

*(PLEASE NOTE: These courses are cross-listed with Kodály Methods I, II and III and meet at the same time and place as these courses)

Monday-Thursday, June 26-June 29

5:00-8:45 p.m.

  • MU 680B - Beyond The Classroom: Bridges To The Community
Monday-Thursday, July 3-6

5:00 p.m. - 8:45 p.m.

  • MU 680C - African American Music Aesthetics In Music Education
June 10-21

MU 680A - Exploring Hip-Hop Music Pedagogy
0/1 Graduate Credit
Lamont Holden, Dr. Adam Kruse

Exploring Hip-Hop Music Pedagogy will engage attendees in a variety of activities centered on Hip-Hop music and culture. From sampling and beatmaking to freestyling and lyric writing, we will create and perform original music with an emphasis on individual expression. We will also explore foundational concepts in Hip-Hop culture and develop critical considerations for contemporary classroom practice.

MU 680B - Voice Pedagogy for the Music Educator
0/1 Graduate Credit
Dr. Rachel Ware Carlton

Course description coming soon!

MU 680C - 21st Century Orff Schulwerk: Making Responsive Teaching and Collaborative Learning Visible
0/1 Graduate Credit
Manju Durairaj

The Orff Schulwerk approach is one of the most sustainable practices in music education. It adapts and evolves with the times, without compromising child centered and child generated learning outcomes, even in a pandemic. This session illustrates the Orff Schulwerk approach using cultural information and processes to scaffold learning, emphasizes communal orientation, and focusing on relationships, cognitive scaffolding, and critical social awareness. This session provides ideas for using award winning books to design lessons and assessments that are framed in culturally responsive teaching, implementing purposeful inclusion strategies for collaborative learning, designing differentiated performance tasks to evoke creativity and higher order thinking skill, creating meaningful rubrics that assess learning, and structure feedback for growth and proficiency.

MU 600A First Steps in Music
0 Graduate Credits
Stephanie Schall-Brazee

During this workshop, participants will be introduced to current research findings and the implications of that research on the development of an early childhood music and movement curriculum. Materials and activities will be presented for children from birth to age 7. Collecting materials, designing teaching strategies, lesson plans and yearly curriculum, as well as developing and promoting an early childhood program, will be covered. Active participation in both music and movement activities will be the basis for most instruction.PLEASE NOTE: This course is cross-listed with Kodály Methods I and meets at the same time and place.

MU 600B – Conversational Solfege – Lower Levels
0 Credit Workshop
TBD

Conversational Solfege is a pedagogical method that develops musical literacy. Based on models used to teach conversational foreign languages, Conversational Solfege develops an understanding of music through the use of rhythm syllables and solfege syllables at the conversational level, then gradually evolves into traditional notation. Through carefully sequenced activities, Conversational Solfege enables students to joyfully assimilate the skills and content necessary to be musically literate. Through various techniques, Conversational Solfege allows the acquisition of musical reading and writing, dictation, improvisation and composition in an intuitive manner. This workshop is applicable to general music, choral and instrumental teachers. PLEASE NOTE: This course is cross-listed with Kodály Methods II and meets at the same time and place.

MU 600C – Conversational Solfege – Upper Levels
0 Credit Workshop
TBD

This workshop further explores the development of musical literacy through analyzing songs and creating a sequence of learning based on song content and skill development. Strategies include listening, reading, writing, writing lesson plans and establishing yearly goals. This workshop also will give you an introduction of how to teach harmonic function in major and minor tonalities as they apply to improvisation and composition. PLEASE NOTE: This course is cross-listed with Kodály Methods III and meets at the same time and place.

MU 605A - Orff Schulwerk Cert-Level I
0 Graduate Credits
Manju Durairaj,
Cyndee Giebler

Course participants will develop their personal musicianship skills, learn to create stylistically and age-appropriate arrangements, and experience pedagogical models appropriate for the elementary and middle school classroom that emphasize improvisation and creativity. This approach stresses the importance of developing the child’s body, ear, and mind as an integrated pathway to creative expression and comprehensive musicianship.

Check back soon for more information!

1 credit courses - $687
  • MU 601 Choral Ensemble
  • MU 690 Research in Music Education
  • MU 79 Capstone Project
  • MU 680A Special Topics
  • MU 680B Special Topics
  • MU 680C Special Topics
2 credit courses - $1,374
  • MU 610 Kodály Methods I
  • MU 620 Kodály Methods II
  • MU 630 Kodály Methods III
  • MU 612 Folk Song History and Research I
  • MU 622 Folk Song History and Research II
  • MU 611 Solfege I
  • MU 621 Solfege II
  • MU 631 Solfege III
  • MU 632 Choral Literature & Advanced Conducting
  • MU 650 History and Philosophy of Music Education
Workshop fees (NOTE: No graduate credit is earned if you register for the courses listed below for 0 credits)
  • MU 6000A First Steps in Music - $420
  • MU 600B Conversational Solfege – Lower Levels - $420
  • MU 600C Conversational Solfege – Upper Levels - $420
  • MU 680A TBD - $210
  • MU 680B TBD - $210
  • MU 680C TBD - $210
  • MU 601 Choral Ensemble - $30


Tuition and fees are due at the time of registration.

Scholarships are available for students within the Master of Music in Music Education – Kodály Emphasis program and the OAKE Endorsed Kodály Certificate program.

The Master of Music in Music Education – Kodály Emphasis degree program is financial aid eligible.

Information about scholarships will be posted soon. Check back soon for more information!

About The Kodály Approach

The Kodály philosophy of music education centers around folk song as the root of a child’s musical experience and the central pathway to musical learning, and also incorporates movement and socialization activities such as dance to engage students with their peers. The values of the Kodály approach include:

  • Every child has a right to musical literacy
  • Singing is the basic act of music-making and is supported by movement, listening, dance, and instrumental performance
  • The folk music of a nation is a primary source of musical repertoire
  • Musical instruction must be systematic, developmentally appropriate, creative, and organized in an explicit sequence from experience to concept, and concept to practical application

About Lakeland University

Sheboygan, Wisconsin

Lakeland University is a historic institution of innovation. Music has always been a part of its history.

“We are truly honored to receive this special program and we look forward to taking it to new heights,” said Lakeland President Beth Borgen. “Music is an important part of Lakeland’s long history, from the summer music camp we’ve hosted for more than 60 years to the legacies of influential music faculty members like Henry Ellerbusch, Edgar Thiessen, Lew Schmidt and Janet Herrick.”

Lakeland University is a liberal arts institution related to the United Church of Christ. Lakeland University’s main campus is located in scenic Sheboygan, WI. Lakeland offers evening and online courses through centers in Milwaukee, Madison, Wisconsin Rapids, Chippewa Valley, Fox Cities and Green Bay. Lakeland also has an international campus located in Tokyo, Japan.

The Kodály Summer Graduate Music program will take place on the main campus in Sheboygan. Program participants will enjoy the picturesque campus including the newly renovated Younger Family Campus Center which houses the Main Dining Hall, Muskie Mart, Daily Grind coffee shop, and The Pub restaurant.

Additional Information

Students will be housed in Brotz Hall which is conveniently located near Verhulst Center (where many music classes will take place) and the Younger Family Campus Center (where classes and meals will be served.) Brotz Hall features a pod-style layout. A pair of pods share access to a large living area, kitchen, and study. Kitchens feature a refrigerator, stove/oven, and microwave. Laundry facilities are available. Bedrooms are large and fully carpeted. Common areas include a comfortable lounge with a fireplace, a computer lab, classrooms, and plenty of study space.

Single rooms can be reserved for $150 per week. Double rooms can be reserved for $75 per week. Any additional days will be prorated based upon these rates.

Click here to see the housing agreement form.

Students are encouraged to consider signing up for a meal plan. Students can choose from the following plans:

Meals per weekCost per mealTotal number of meals
for 2 weeks
Cost per weekCost for 2 weeksWeekend Meals
(Brunch/Dinner)
15$4.0030$60.00$120.00*$4.00 per added meal on weekends
10$4.5020$45.00$90.00$4.50 per added meal on weekends
5$5.0010$25.00$50.00$5.00 per added meal on weekends

*Recommended for residential students

Meals purchased through the meal plan can be used at the following locations on campus:

  • Main Dining Hall – Most meals will be eaten here. Housed in the newly renovated Younger Family Campus Center, the main dining hall is “all you care to eat.” This is a great resource to fuel up for a busy day of classes and learning.
  • Daily Grind – Coffee shop, a required stop to fuel up on coffee between classes. Grab-and-go breakfasts can be picked up here. Individual coffee/specialty drinks can be purchased using money you have added to your ID card or purchased individually.

Required textbooks will be available for purchase through the Lakeland University Bookstore. You will be able to view required textbooks at the Lakeland University Bookstore’s website in the spring of 2022 when registration opens.

A course fee of $30 will be applied to those registering for Choral Ensemble for 0 or 1 credit. This fee covers the purchase of your choral music. You will receive your packet of music at the start of the program.

For questions about course textbooks, please contact Dr. Franklin Gallo at gallof@lakeland.edu.

Frequently Asked Questions

For admissions and financial aid questions, please contact Jane Bouche at boucheja@lakeland.edu or 920-565-1022 ext. 2143.

For course-related questions, please contact the program director, Dr. Franklin Gallo at gallof@lakeland.edu or 920-565-1000 ext. 3103.

Send Email

Absolutely! The Kodály Concept of music education is beneficial and directly applicable for teachers in instrumental classrooms. While many program participants teach in general and choral classrooms, each year a good number of teachers who teach in instrumental settings participate in the program in pursuit of their Master of Music and/or their OAKE endorsed Kodály Certificate. This number has increased in recent years, as more instrumental teachers are drawn to the core tenents of the Kodály method to music education. One recent student created a curriculum for 5th grade band based entirely upon the Kodály Concept. She has presented her work at numerous state and national conferences.

Ethan Zick, a WI based educator and recent program graduate, said this: What surprised me about this program was its relevance to my teaching in instrumental music. Whether in band or orchestra, understanding the Kodály method through this program allows the instructor to fully understand the value of familiar, approachable folk music in educational repertoire. The instructor is also able to help students better understand the functionality of pitches and melody as opposed to arbitrarily matching notes to fingerings, which I find especially important for beginning students. This program overall has given me a deeper understanding of how instrumental students can understand their music at a more meaningful level.

Master of Music in Music Education – Kodály emphasis students and Kodály Certificate students need to submit official transcripts from their undergraduate degree conferring institution. Official transcripts for any graduate credits earned must also be submitted if you would like the credits considered for transfer. Transcripts should be sent directly to Lakeland University – Admissions. For questions, please contact Jane Bouch at admissions@lakeland.edu.

Yes! Meal plans are available. 

Scholarships are available for students in the Master of Music in Music Education – Kodály Emphasis and the Kodály Certificate programs. Please see the scholarship tabs above for information on how to apply, or contact Jane Bouche at boucheja@lakeland.edu for assistance. Scholarship applications are due by June 1, 2022.

Financial aid is only available to students in the Master of Music in Music Education – Kodály Emphasis program. A Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) must be completed by June 1. For information about financial aid, please contact boucheja@lakeland.edu.

The Kodály Summer graduate music program will be held June 26 - July 7, 2023

There will be a course available the weekend prior on June 24-25. This course will be announced soon. Please contact program director Dr. Franklin Gallo for information about this class at gallof@lakeland.edu.

Lakeland University will offer Orff-Schulwerk Level I this summer July 10-21. For more information, please see the Orff-Schulwerk page, or contact program director Dr. Franklin Gallo for more information at gallof@lakeland.edu.

It may be possible to transfer some of your graduate credits. The Program Director and the Office of the Registrar will review your transcripts and other relevant course materials, such as syllabi, for possible transfer. Credits must be evaluated for transfer prior to the start of the program. For questions, please contact program director Dr. Franklin Gallo at gallof@lakeland.edu or 920-565-1000 ext. 3103.

There is no required dress code for the program, however students are encouraged to dress comfortably as movement will be integrated in a number of classes. It is helpful to note that as a member of the choral ensemble, you will participate in a choral concert on the last Thursday of the program. You are encouraged to bring something semi-formal that you would feel comfortable wearing on stage for a performance.

For the best experience, students are encouraged to consider signing up for a meal plan. Meal plans include breakfast, lunch, and dinner M-F each day of the program. 

Students are asked to bring a tuning fork.

Yes. Current students in their third and fourth year of the program serve as mentors for first year students in the Certificate and/or Master of Music in Music Education – Kodály Emphasis degree program. Mentors and mentees agree to share e-mail addresses prior to the program and are encouraged to sit together during lunch on the first day of the program. Mentees can contract their mentor to ask questions about the program from the student perspective. Please contact Dr. Franklin Gallo, gallof@lakeland.edu, for any questions about this program.

History of the Program

The Kodály Summer Graduate Music program moved to Lakeland University from Holy Family College (formerly Silver Lake College of the Holy Family) where it was begun by Sister Lorna Zemke. Sister Lorna began her career working alongside Katinka Daniel on a Kodály pilot program in Santa Barbara, CA. She went on to become an initial founder of the Organization of American Kodály Educators, Midwest Kodály Music Educators of America, and Association of Wisconsin Area Kodály Educators. Sister Lorna directed the Kodály Summer Graduate Music program at Holy Family College for more than 40 years.

We are honored to have Sister Lorna on the faculty at Lakeland University where she will serve as a faculty advisor on student Capstone Projects.

Sister Lorna with students
Sister Lorna

Sister Lorna Zemke

Sister Lorna Zemke, national and international clinician in the Kodály Approach to Music Education, is the founder of the Kodály Summer Graduate Music program which began at Holy Family College (formerly Silver Lake College of the Holy Family) where she was emeritus professor of music. Dr. Zemke earned her MM and DMA degrees in Music Education at the University of Southern California after spending several years collaborating with Katinka Daniel on a Kodály pilot program in Santa Barbara and six months collecting primary source materials on the Kodály Concept in Hungary. She taught on more than 100 college and university campuses and at many state, regional, national and international conferences. She has developed a program “Music for the Unborn” and directed a large early childhood music education program “Music for Tots” at Holy Family College. She has published several books and many articles and has spoken at international music education conferences in countries including Japan, Greece, Australia, England and Canada. In 2012, GIA Pub., Chicago produced a DVD with Dr. Zemke entitled,” Musical Motivators for Early Childhood.” Dr. Zemke has received many honors and awards for her professional service, leadership, and performance in the field of music education.

Thank you for making a difference!

Support The Program

The Kodály Summer Graduate Music program is a premiere experience for our students.

It is designed for elementary, secondary, and independent music teachers who are seeking to grow their pedagogical, personal musicianship, and research skills. The program faculty are leaders in the field of music education and provide an experience that is joyful, supportive, and immensely meaningful.

Your support of this program affords scholarship opportunities that in turn bring these attributes and program expertise back to their own students and schools.

To donate, please click the button below to be directed to a secure site to make your donation.

You may also make a gift by mailing a check to:

            Advancement Office
            Lakeland University
            W3718 South Dr
            Plymouth, WI 53073

To offer ongoing support to the Lakeland University music department and to receive VIP benefits, please also consider joining Lakeland’s Encore Circle. Click the button below to learn more about this exclusive giving opportunity.

If you have any questions, please contact our Advancement office at advancement@lakeland.edu or 920-565-1023.

Make A Gift
Encore Circle
Kodály students and professors
Kodály students in class

Webinars

Kodály Graduate Music Webinar Series

Lakeland University is proud to launch the Kodály Graduate Music Webinar Series. This series will explore a wide variety of topics related to Kodály pedagogy. Click the link below and fill out the form to receive access to previously recorded webinars. 

View Previously Recorded Webinars

Interested? Fill out the form below to learn more!

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